Sarah Dayan

Sarah Dayan

For my own logo as a lettering artist, I chose to emphasize three facets: simplicity, mastery and timelessness. It's important for me to establish trust with my clients, and this is what my branding needed to enable. My logo had to not only be unique, but also have a level of precision that would help people define what my quality standards are so they can feel safe hiring me.

  • Sarah Dayan
  • Sarah Dayan

Research

The idea of doing a monogram came quickly. By only using my initials instead of my full name, I allowed more creativity and versatility with the format. Monograms are a risk because they're not explicit. It takes more time for people to associate it with your brand if you don't have the possibility to run large advertising campaigns. Yet, if done well, they have a huge power due to their graphic nature. I decided to take that chance, because I was designing it with a long-game mindset: my logo was here to stay, not be replaced every six months.

The risk you run when drawing interlaced letters is altering legibility. By using dotted paper and drawing at large scale, I made sure that my drawing would remain clear and understandable. I filled many pages before achieving this final pencil concept.

Sarah Dayan

Final concept

I went with monoline to convey simplicity and timelessness. The interlaced letters reach a level of complexity that would have become cluttered if associated with thicks and thins. By using a single-width stroke, I kept my logo from trends and went for something that would pass the test of time. I picked the thickness of the stroke so it would look bold at big scale and remain legible at small scale. The cuts at every intersection add dimension to the logo while using solid colors only. The letters look like they're really interlaced, not just set on one another.

The result is a creative, sophisticated yet simple and timeless logo. It leaves a strong impression and is highly recognizable.